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New England Life Insurance Pty Ltd ABN 34 541 763 742 (t/a farmercover) is a Corporate Authorised Representative (No. 417493) of Aon Hewitt Financial Advice Limited ABN13 091 225 642 Australian Financial Services License No. 239183 Aon Hewitt Head Office: Level 33, 201 Kent Streeet, Sydney 2000 © farmercover 2015

For more information, please call us on 1300 676 290 

The information contained on this website may be regarded as general advice. That is, your personal objectives, needs or financial situations were not taken into account when preparing this information. Accordingly, you should consider the appropriateness of any general advice we have given you, having regard to your objectives, financial situation and needs before acting on it. Where the information relates to a particular financial product, you should obtain the relevant product disclosure statement before making any decision to purchase that financial product.  
Risks and Hazards (General)
Farm safety hazards that can cause injury and illness include animals, chemicals, vehicles, machinery, electricity and other power supplies, dams, lakes, high places and the weather. Farm-related workplace accidents are preventable if proper safety procedures are used by all workers and family members at all times. Everyone working, visiting or living on a farm needs to understand the risks.
Children
Children who live on farms are at greater risk of injury or death than adults. Common hazards include drowning in dams, tanks and creeks, injury from guns or chemicals, accidents with tractors, motorbikes, other machinery, falls and animals. Older children can be taught farm safety, but still need to be supervised at all times.
Quad bikes
Contrary to the name, quad bikes (also referred to as all-terrain vehicles) are not safe for use in all terrains - they are four-wheeled motorbikes. These vehicles are not stable and have been involved in many injuries and deaths. Always follow manufacturer's instructions for vehicle use, wear protective clothing when riding and ride in a responsible manner. Never allow children near quad bikes.
Falls
Falls are a leading cause of injury and death for farm workers. Common hazards include animals, motorbikes and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs, or quad bikes), working at heights in silos or on tractors, harvesters, cherry pickers or windmills, uneven surfaces and uncovered wells. Older farmers are most at risk. Simple safety measures can reduce the danger.
Handling Agrichemicals
There are many chemicals on the farm and some of them can be dangerous. Common agricultural chemicals include fuels, pesticides, herbicides, fungicides and veterinary chemicals. Exposure to chemicals can lead to health effects including headache, poisoning, respiratory illness, burns, cancers and birth defects. Always follow the manufacturers' instructions for storage, transport, use and disposal of chemicals. Keep all chemicals locked away and out of reach of children and wear appropriate protective gear.
Handling Animals
Many injuries to farmers and farm workers occur when handling livestock. Animals are unpredictable, especially during the mating season or when protecting their young. Cattle, dogs, pigs, horses and sheep should be treated with caution. Attempting to lift or push animals can cause injury and animals are capable of transmitting certain diseases. Children should always be supervised around farm animals
Machinery
Machinery is responsible for many deaths and injuries each year on farms. Particular culprits include tractors and quad bikes. Common tractor accidents involve roll-overs, run-overs and unguarded power take-off shafts. All tractors must have roll-over protection and always use seatbelts. Don't let passengers, in particular children, ride on a tractor.
Manual Handling
Farming is a very physical occupation and workers can injure themselves by lifting heavy loads such as chemicals, fertiliser, hay bales, calves, buckets, equipment, and also while handling animals. Most agricultural manual handling injuries involve the back and weight-bearing joints and the risk of injury can be minimised by good lifting techniques and safe working habits. Use mechanical lifting aids or get help to lift and carry heavy loads whenever possible.
Sheep and Shearing
Working with sheep can be dangerous. Badly designed shearing sheds and yards present a range of physical, chemical and biological hazards. A safe working environment can minimise the chances of injury and illness. Make sure shearing sheds are well designed, lit and ventilated, agricultural and veterinary chemicals are stored and used appropriately, and machinery is safe and well maintained.
Crush Injuries
A crush injury occurs when the body or a body part is trapped, pinched or jammed under or between objects. The pressure can harm skin, muscles, nerves or bone, depending on the degree of force. On Victorian farms, the most commonly injured body parts are the hands and fingers.
Confined Spaces
Confined spaces on farms are dangerous. Water tanks, silos, wells, vats. manure pits, tunnels and other confined spaces can suffocate a person with fumes or low oxygen levels. Farm workers, children and other people are at risk. People making a rescue attempt can also be in danger. Proper safety procedures are vital, including having a rescue plan and safety equipment.

Farm Safety

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The information contained on this website may be regarded as general advice. That is, your personal objectives, needs or financial situations were not taken into account when preparing this information. Accordingly, you should consider the appropriateness of any general advice we have given you, having regard to your objectives, financial situation and needs before acting on it. Where the information relates to a particular financial product, you should obtain the relevant product disclosure statement before making any decision to purchase that financial product.  
New England Life Insurance Pty Ltd ABN 34 541 763 742 (t/a FarmerCover) is a Corporate Authorised Representative (No. 417493) of Aon Hewitt Financial Advice Limited ABN13 091 225 642 Australian Financial Services License No. 239183 Aon Hewitt Head Office: Level 33, 201 Kent Streeet, Sydney 2000 © farmercover 2015
We’re about family
Risks and Hazards (General)
Farm safety hazards that can cause injury and illness include animals, chemicals, vehicles, machinery, electricity and other power supplies, dams, lakes, high places and the weather. Farm-related workplace accidents are preventable if proper safety procedures are used by all workers and family members at all times. Everyone working, visiting or living on a farm needs to understand the risks.

Farm Safety

Children
Children who live on farms are at greater risk of injury or death than adults. Common hazards include drowning in dams, tanks and creeks, injury from guns or chemicals, accidents with tractors, motorbikes, other machinery, falls and animals. Older children can be taught farm safety, but still need to be supervised at all times.
Quad bikes
Contrary to the name, quad bikes (also referred to as all-terrain vehicles) are not safe for use in all terrains - they are four-wheeled motorbikes. These vehicles are not stable and have been involved in many injuries and deaths. Always follow manufacturer's instructions for vehicle use, wear protective clothing when riding and ride in a responsible manner. Never allow children near quad bikes.
Falls
Falls are a leading cause of injury and death for farm workers. Common hazards include animals, motorbikes and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs, or quad bikes), working at heights in silos or on tractors, harvesters, cherry pickers or windmills, uneven surfaces and uncovered wells. Older farmers are most at risk. Simple safety measures can reduce the danger.
Handling Agrichemicals
There are many chemicals on the farm and some of them can be dangerous. Common agricultural chemicals include fuels, pesticides, herbicides, fungicides and veterinary chemicals. Exposure to chemicals can lead to health effects including headache, poisoning, respiratory illness, burns, cancers and birth defects. Always follow the manufacturers' instructions for storage, transport, use and disposal of chemicals. Keep all chemicals locked away and out of reach of children and wear appropriate protective gear.
Handling Animals
Many injuries to farmers and farm workers occur when handling livestock. Animals are unpredictable, especially during the mating season or when protecting their young. Cattle, dogs, pigs, horses and sheep should be treated with caution. Attempting to lift or push animals can cause injury and animals are capable of transmitting certain diseases. Children should always be supervised around farm animals
Machinery
Machinery is responsible for many deaths and injuries each year on farms. Particular culprits include tractors and quad bikes. Common tractor accidents involve roll-overs, run-overs and unguarded power take-off shafts. All tractors must have roll-over protection and always use seatbelts. Don't let passengers, in particular children, ride on a tractor.
Manual Handling
Farming is a very physical occupation and workers can injure themselves by lifting heavy loads such as chemicals, fertiliser, hay bales, calves, buckets, equipment, and also while handling animals. Most agricultural manual handling injuries involve the back and weight-bearing joints and the risk of injury can be minimised by good lifting techniques and safe working habits. Use mechanical lifting aids or get help to lift and carry heavy loads whenever possible.
Sheep and Shearing
Working with sheep can be dangerous. Badly designed shearing sheds and yards present a range of physical, chemical and biological hazards. A safe working environment can minimise the chances of injury and illness. Make sure shearing sheds are well designed, lit and ventilated, agricultural and veterinary chemicals are stored and used appropriately, and machinery is safe and well maintained.
Crush Injuries
A crush injury occurs when the body or a body part is trapped, pinched or jammed under or between objects. The pressure can harm skin, muscles, nerves or bone, depending on the degree of force. On Victorian farms, the most commonly injured body parts are the hands and fingers.
Confined Spaces
Confined spaces on farms are dangerous. Water tanks, silos, wells, vats. manure pits, tunnels and other confined spaces can suffocate a person with fumes or low oxygen levels. Farm workers, children and other people are at risk. People making a rescue attempt can also be in danger. Proper safety procedures are vital, including having a rescue plan and safety equipment.